PODCASTS AND MAGAZINES

UNSUNG HEROES OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

The Unsung Heroes Project was conceived in 2009-10, when Matthew Barr, professor of Media Studies, and Dr. Chuck Bolton, professor of history co-taught an interdisciplinary course, Doing Visual History. Students from the two departments learned how to conduct and record oral history interviews on video. In 2010, the collaboration expanded to include Dr. Curtis Austin of Arizona State University; Austin, Bolton, and Barr interviewed three Civil Rights Movement veterans in the Hattiesburg, Mississippi, area.

 

Unsung Heroes'Yes, and Cafe' Podcast
00:00 / 25:31

CURIOUS OBJECTS, THE MAGAZINE ANTIQUES 

Scholar Torren Gatson, guest editor for the current edition of the MESDA Journal, comes on the pod to talk about an iron fireback (a metal plate protecting the back wall of a fireplace) produced at the Vesuvius Furnace in Lincoln County, North Carolina. Established by revolutionary war veteran Joseph Graham, the furnace depended on slave labor—oftentimes quite skilled—as well as that of freedmen and white women. Gatson’s research paints a compelling picture of the unique work culture this state of affairs produced.

TO LISTEN TO THE PODCAST EPISODE, CLICK HERE.

SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS

MUSEUM OF THE CONFEDERACY

For three consecutive summers, while pursuing my master's degree, I had the opportunity to work for the Museum of the Confederacy (MOC) in Richmond Virginia. My university, North Carolina Central University, partnered with the MOC to produce a program designed to give graduate students hands-on experience in collections management. There I was responsible along with three other graduate students for processing the Jefferson Davis Family papers. Within those papers, I was responsible for the Jefferson Davis legal files. This experience was enriching, as it sparked an interest in nineteenth-century history while simultaneously educating me on the principles and laws that govern archives and collections management.

 

TO READ CBS6 NEWS COVERAGE OF THIS EXPERIENCE, CLICK HERE.

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One of the most important aspects of public history and historic preservation is engaging with the community and starting a progressive conversation about various public history stories, adventures, or contemporary issues. Graduate students of the Center for Historic Preservation (CHP) at Middle Tennessee State University are urged to contribute to that conversation by publishing blog posts to CHP's managed website Southern Rambles. I have contributed several blog posts to this site and am eager to share them with you! Click on the logo above to read my blog contributions. 

OTHER MEDIA AND BLOG POSTS